On the Path to Becoming a Female STEM Role Model in Acadia

By Sophia Ludtke, Spring Power & Gas Fellow

This summer, through a sponsorship with Spring Power & Gas, high schooler Sophia Ludtke traveled to Maine to take part on the Earthwatch expedition Climate Change: Sea to Trees at Acadia National Park. Sophia shares her experience from her time in the field.


Sophia conducting field work in Acadia National Park.

Sophia conducting field work in Acadia National Park.

Through the very generous sponsorship of Spring Power & Gas, I was given the opportunity to join 12 other high school students in Acadia National Park this summer to examine how climate change is impacting the biodiversity in this region of Maine. From a young age, I have loved both science and the outdoors, but before this trip, I never could have imagined how these two interests could be combined in such an exciting way. By participating in research conducted outdoors in the field through the work of citizen scientists and professionals alike, I now know how accessible science can be.

Specifically, we were looking at how warming temperatures are impacting bird migration and fruit availability––and the overlap between the two. The scientists leading this research hypothesize that birds seeking cool temperatures are migrating further north during the winter, thus passing over Acadia during their return flight south later in the season. Meanwhile, warmer temperatures, scientists speculate, are causing fruit to bloom earlier in the season. If both of these hypotheses are true, this timing mismatch could deprive birds of the fuel they need for their long migration, while also depriving the plants of the fruit consumers they rely on to spread their seeds.

As our leading scientist Dr. Feldman explained, this interaction is a microcosm for what is happening around the globe. We know that temperatures are rising, but we don’t know exactly how this may affect our planet’s animals, plants, and people. While, at times, climate change can seem like a huge issue, too big for one individual to tackle, this experience helped shift my perspective, allowing me to recognize the impact small contributions can have. From biology driven research, like what we were doing in Acadia, to an engineering innovation, to an environmentally-conscious policy or law, to a powerful piece of artwork –– it is uplifting to know there are many ways in which people are already fighting for a healthier planet.

While I still don’t know exactly what role I may play, this experience reaffirmed my desire to be a part of the fight.

This experience also immersed me in the whole scientific process and made me realize that it’s something I admire and identify with. Each day in the field was a little different: we’d trek through thick brush to set up 1 meter by 2 meter plots; we’d crouch down on intertidal rocks in search of invertebrates; we’d fill red and yellow cups with water in hopes of catching insects; we’d count the number of huckleberries in each of our plots. At times, the work was challenging, but I truly felt like the data we were collecting could be used to discover something new, something of importance on a global scale.

To be working side by side with a professional scientist at such a young age was incredibly empowering.

One highlight of the week was a presentation given by a female scientist conducting research similar to what we were doing. She described her work, answered questions, and asked us about our interests. Even though female role models in STEM abound in movies, books, articles, etc., it was so inspirational to get to talk to a female scientist in person. It made me realize that someday I could be like her, getting to present research I was passionate about to a new generation of aspiring female scientists.

My week in Acadia flew by, and if I could return, I would do so in a heartbeat.

I miss the breathtaking scenery. It was almost magical to look up at the stars in the pure midnight sky. Spending a week feeling this connected to nature reaffirmed the importance of preserving our planet’s natural beauty for future generations to enjoy.

I miss the science. From counting caterpillars, to looking through microscopes, to searching for hermit crabs, it was a once in a lifetime experience to be immersed in this type of learning environment. I feel as if I’ve found a field – environmental science – that I really identify with and may want to pursue down the road.

But, most of all, I miss the people. We all bonded so much, whether counting huckleberries or looking up at the magical night sky. I know that we will all keep in touch for years to come.

I am so thankful to have had this incredible experience, and I hope many more students down the road get to enjoy this same life-changing experience.


To learn more about this expedition, visit our website – Climate Change: Sea to Trees at Acadia National Park.

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